Removed what I believe is an incorrect #ifdef HAVE_* test.
[icculus/xz.git] / INSTALL
1
2 XZ Utils Installation
3 =====================
4
5     0. Preface
6     1. Supported platforms
7        1.1. Compilers
8        1.2. Platform-specific notes
9             1.2.1. IRIX
10             1.2.2. MINIX 3
11             1.2.3. OpenVMS
12             1.2.4. Tru64
13             1.2.5. Windows
14             1.2.6. DOS
15        1.3. Adding support for new platforms
16     2. configure options
17        2.1. Static vs. dynamic linking of liblzma
18        2.2. Optimizing xzdec and lzmadec
19     3. xzgrep and other scripts
20        3.1. Dependencies
21        3.2. PATH
22     4. Troubleshooting
23        4.1. "No C99 compiler was found."
24        4.2. "No POSIX conforming shell (sh) was found."
25        4.3. configure works but build fails at crc32_x86.S
26        4.4. Lots of warnings about symbol visibility
27
28
29 0. Preface
30 ----------
31
32     If you aren't familiar with building packages that use GNU Autotools,
33     see the file INSTALL.generic for generic instructions before reading
34     further.
35
36     If you are going to build a package for distribution, see also the
37     file PACKAGERS. It contains information that should help making the
38     binary packages as good as possible, but the information isn't very
39     interesting to those making local builds for private use or for use
40     in special situations like embedded systems.
41
42
43 1. Supported platforms
44 ----------------------
45
46     XZ Utils are developed on GNU/Linux, but they should work on many
47     POSIX-like operating systems like *BSDs and Solaris, and even on
48     a few non-POSIX operating systems.
49
50
51 1.1. Compilers
52
53     A C99 compiler is required to compile XZ Utils. If you use GCC, you
54     need at least version 3.x.x. GCC version 2.xx.x doesn't support some
55     C99 features used in XZ Utils source code, thus GCC 2 won't compile
56     XZ Utils.
57
58     XZ Utils takes advantage of some GNU C extensions when building
59     with GCC. Because these extensions are used only when building
60     with GCC, it should be possible to use any C99 compiler.
61
62
63 1.2. Platform-specific notes
64
65 1.2.1. IRIX
66
67     MIPSpro 7.4.4m has been reported to produce broken code if using
68     the -O2 optimization flag ("make check" fails). Using -O1 should
69     work.
70
71
72 1.2.2. MINIX 3
73
74     The default install of MINIX 3 includes Amsterdam Compiler Kit (ACK),
75     which doesn't support C99. Install GCC to compile XZ Utils.
76
77     MINIX 3.1.8 (and possibly some other versions too) has bugs in
78     /usr/include/stdint.h, which has to be patched before XZ Utils
79     can be compiled correctly. See
80     <http://gforge.cs.vu.nl/gf/project/minix/tracker/?action=TrackerItemEdit&tracker_item_id=537>.
81
82     XZ Utils doesn't have code to detect the amount of physical RAM and
83     number of CPU cores on MINIX 3.
84
85     See section 4.4 in this file about symbol visibility warnings (you
86     may want to pass gl_cv_cc_visibility=no to configure).
87
88
89 1.2.3. OpenVMS
90
91     XZ Utils can be built for OpenVMS, but the build system files
92     are not included in the XZ Utils source package. The required
93     OpenVMS-specific files are maintained by Jouk Jansen and can be
94     downloaded here:
95
96         http://nchrem.tnw.tudelft.nl/openvms/software2.html#xzutils
97
98
99 1.2.4. Tru64
100
101     If you try to use the native C compiler on Tru64 (passing CC=cc to
102     configure), you may need the workaround mention in section 4.1 in
103     this file (pass also ac_cv_prog_cc_c99= to configure).
104
105
106 1.2.5. Windows
107
108     Building XZ Utils on Windows is supported under MinGW + MSYS,
109     MinGW-w64 + MSYS, and Cygwin. There is windows/build.bash to
110     ease packaging XZ Utils with MinGW(-w64) + MSYS into a
111     redistributable .zip or .7z file. See windows/INSTALL-Windows.txt
112     for more information.
113
114     It might be possible to build liblzma with a non-GNU toolchain too,
115     but that will probably require writing a separate makefile. Building
116     the command line tools with non-GNU toolchains will be harder than
117     building only liblzma.
118
119     Even if liblzma is built with MinGW, the resulting DLL or static
120     library can be used by other compilers and linkers, including MSVC.
121     Thus, it shouldn't be a problem to use MinGW to build liblzma even
122     if you cannot use MinGW to build the rest of your project. See
123     windows/README-Windows.txt for details.
124
125
126 1.2.6. DOS
127
128     There is an experimental Makefile in the "dos" directory to build
129     XZ Utils on DOS using DJGPP. Support for long file names (LFN) is
130     needed. See dos/README for more information.
131
132     GNU Autotools based build hasn't been tried on DOS. If you try, I
133     would like to hear if it worked.
134
135
136 1.3. Adding support for new platforms
137
138     If you have written patches to make XZ Utils to work on previously
139     unsupported platform, please send the patches to me! I will consider
140     including them to the official version. It's nice to minimize the
141     need of third-party patching.
142
143     One exception: Don't request or send patches to change the whole
144     source package to C89. I find C99 substantially nicer to write and
145     maintain. However, the public library headers must be in C89 to
146     avoid frustrating those who maintain programs, which are strictly
147     in C89 or C++.
148
149
150 2. configure options
151 --------------------
152
153     In most cases, the defaults are what you want. Many of the options
154     below are useful only when building a size-optimized version of
155     liblzma or command line tools.
156
157     --enable-encoders=LIST
158     --disable-encoders
159                 Specify a comma-separated LIST of filter encoders to
160                 build. See "./configure --help" for exact list of
161                 available filter encoders. The default is to build all
162                 supported encoders.
163
164                 If LIST is empty or --disable-encoders is used, no filter
165                 encoders will be built and also the code shared between
166                 encoders will be omitted.
167
168                 Disabling encoders will remove some symbols from the
169                 liblzma ABI, so this option should be used only when it
170                 is known to not cause problems.
171
172     --enable-decoders=LIST
173     --disable-decoders
174                 This is like --enable-encoders but for decoders. The
175                 default is to build all supported decoders.
176
177     --enable-match-finders=LIST
178                 liblzma includes two categories of match finders:
179                 hash chains and binary trees. Hash chains (hc3 and hc4)
180                 are quite fast but they don't provide the best compression
181                 ratio. Binary trees (bt2, bt3 and bt4) give excellent
182                 compression ratio, but they are slower and need more
183                 memory than hash chains.
184
185                 You need to enable at least one match finder to build the
186                 LZMA1 or LZMA2 filter encoders. Usually hash chains are
187                 used only in the fast mode, while binary trees are used to
188                 when the best compression ratio is wanted.
189
190                 The default is to build all the match finders if LZMA1
191                 or LZMA2 filter encoders are being built.
192
193     --enable-checks=LIST
194                 liblzma support multiple integrity checks. CRC32 is
195                 mandatory, and cannot be omitted. See "./configure --help"
196                 for exact list of available integrity check types.
197
198                 liblzma and the command line tools can decompress files
199                 which use unsupported integrity check type, but naturally
200                 the file integrity cannot be verified in that case.
201
202                 Disabling integrity checks may remove some symbols from
203                 the liblzma ABI, so this option should be used only when
204                 it is known to not cause problems.
205
206     --disable-xz
207     --disable-xzdec
208     --disable-lzmadec
209     --disable-lzmainfo
210                 Don't build and install the command line tool mentioned
211                 in the option name.
212
213                 NOTE: Disabling xz will skip some tests in "make check".
214
215                 NOTE: If xzdec is disabled and lzmadec is left enabled,
216                 a dangling man page symlink lzmadec.1 -> xzdec.1 is
217                 created.
218
219     --disable-lzma-links
220                 Don't create symlinks for LZMA Utils compatibility.
221                 This includes lzma, unlzma, and lzcat. If scripts are
222                 installed, also lzdiff, lzcmp, lzgrep, lzegrep, lzfgrep,
223                 lzmore, and lzless will be omitted if this option is used.
224
225     --disable-scripts
226                 Don't install the scripts xzdiff, xzgrep, xzmore, xzless,
227                 and their symlinks.
228
229     --disable-assembler
230                 liblzma includes some assembler optimizations. Currently
231                 there is only assembler code for CRC32 and CRC64 for
232                 32-bit x86.
233
234                 All the assembler code in liblzma is position-independent
235                 code, which is suitable for use in shared libraries and
236                 position-independent executables. So far only i386
237                 instructions are used, but the code is optimized for i686
238                 class CPUs. If you are compiling liblzma exclusively for
239                 pre-i686 systems, you may want to disable the assembler
240                 code.
241
242     --enable-unaligned-access
243                 Allow liblzma to use unaligned memory access for 16-bit
244                 and 32-bit loads and stores. This should be enabled only
245                 when the hardware supports this, i.e. when unaligned
246                 access is fast. Some operating system kernels emulate
247                 unaligned access, which is extremely slow. This option
248                 shouldn't be used on systems that rely on such emulation.
249
250                 Unaligned access is enabled by default on x86, x86-64,
251                 and big endian PowerPC.
252
253     --enable-small
254                 Reduce the size of liblzma by selecting smaller but
255                 semantically equivalent version of some functions, and
256                 omit precomputed lookup tables. This option tends to
257                 make liblzma slightly slower.
258
259                 Note that while omitting the precomputed tables makes
260                 liblzma smaller on disk, the tables are still needed at
261                 run time, and need to be computed at startup. This also
262                 means that the RAM holding the tables won't be shared
263                 between applications linked against shared liblzma.
264
265                 This option doesn't modify CFLAGS to tell the compiler
266                 to optimize for size. You need to add -Os or equivalent
267                 flag(s) to CFLAGS manually.
268
269     --enable-assume-ram=SIZE
270                 On the most common operating systems, XZ Utils is able to
271                 detect the amount of physical memory on the system. This
272                 information is used by the options --memlimit-compress,
273                 --memlimit-decompress, and --memlimit when setting the
274                 limit to a percentage of total RAM.
275
276                 On some systems, there is no code to detect the amount of
277                 RAM though. Using --enable-assume-ram one can set how much
278                 memory to assume on these systems. SIZE is given as MiB.
279                 The default is 128 MiB.
280
281                 Feel free to send patches to add support for detecting
282                 the amount of RAM on the operating system you use. See
283                 src/common/tuklib_physmem.c for details.
284
285     --disable-threads
286                 Disable threading support. This makes some things
287                 thread-unsafe, meaning that if multithreaded application
288                 calls liblzma functions from more than one thread,
289                 something bad may happen.
290
291                 Use this option if threading support causes you trouble,
292                 or if you know that you will use liblzma only from
293                 single-threaded applications and want to avoid dependency
294                 on libpthread.
295
296     --enable-debug
297                 This enables the assert() macro and possibly some other
298                 run-time consistency checks. It makes the code slower, so
299                 you normally don't want to have this enabled.
300
301     --enable-werror
302                 If building with GCC, make all compiler warnings an error,
303                 that abort the compilation. This may help catching bugs,
304                 and should work on most systems. This has no effect on the
305                 resulting binaries.
306
307
308 2.1. Static vs. dynamic linking of liblzma
309
310     On 32-bit x86, linking against static liblzma can give a minor
311     speed improvement. Static libraries on x86 are usually compiled as
312     position-dependent code (non-PIC) and shared libraries are built as
313     position-independent code (PIC). PIC wastes one register, which can
314     make the code slightly slower compared to a non-PIC version. (Note
315     that this doesn't apply to x86-64.)
316
317     If you want to link xz against static liblzma, the simplest way
318     is to pass --disable-shared to configure. If you want also shared
319     liblzma, run configure again and run "make install" only for
320     src/liblzma.
321
322
323 2.2. Optimizing xzdec and lzmadec
324
325     xzdec and lzmadec are intended to be relatively small instead of
326     optimizing for the best speed. Thus, it is a good idea to build
327     xzdec and lzmadec separately:
328
329       - To link the tools against static liblzma, pass --disable-shared
330         to configure.
331
332       - To select somewhat size-optimized variant of some things in
333         liblzma, pass --enable-small to configure.
334
335       - Tell the compiler to optimize for size instead of speed.
336         E.g. with GCC, put -Os into CFLAGS.
337
338       - xzdec and lzmadec will never use multithreading capabilities of
339         liblzma. You can avoid dependency on libpthread by passing
340         --disable-threads to configure.
341
342       - There are and will be no translated messages for xzdec and
343         lzmadec, so it is fine to pass also --disable-nls to configure.
344
345       - Only decoder code is needed, so you can speed up the build
346         slightly by passing --disable-encoders to configure. This
347         shouldn't affect the final size of the executables though,
348         because the linker is able to omit the encoder code anyway.
349
350     If you have no use for xzdec or lzmadec, you can disable them with
351     --disable-xzdec and --disable-lzmadec.
352
353
354 3. xzgrep and other scripts
355 ---------------------------
356
357 3.1. Dependencies
358
359     POSIX shell (sh) and bunch of other standard POSIX tools are required
360     to run the scripts. The configure script tries to find a POSIX
361     compliant sh, but if it fails, you can force the shell by passing
362     gl_cv_posix_shell=/path/to/posix-sh as an argument to the configure
363     script.
364
365     Some of the scripts require also mktemp. The original mktemp can be
366     found from <http://www.mktemp.org/>. On GNU, most will use the mktemp
367     program from GNU coreutils instead of the original implementation.
368     Both mktemp versions are fine for XZ Utils (and practically for
369     everything else too).
370
371
372 3.2. PATH
373
374     The scripts assume that the required tools (standard POSIX utilities,
375     mktemp, and xz) are in PATH; the scripts don't set the PATH themselves.
376     Some people like this while some think this is a bug. Those in the
377     latter group can easily patch the scripts before running the configure
378     script by taking advantage of a placeholder line in the scripts.
379
380     For example, to make the scripts prefix /usr/bin:/bin to PATH:
381
382         perl -pi -e 's|^#SET_PATH.*$|PATH=/usr/bin:/bin:\$PATH|' \
383                 src/scripts/xz*.in
384
385
386 4. Troubleshooting
387 ------------------
388
389 4.1. "No C99 compiler was found."
390
391     You need a C99 compiler to build XZ Utils. If the configure script
392     cannot find a C99 compiler and you think you have such a compiler
393     installed, set the compiler command by passing CC=/path/to/c99 as
394     an argument to the configure script.
395
396     If you get this error even when you think your compiler supports C99,
397     you can override the test by passing ac_cv_prog_cc_c99= as an argument
398     to the configure script. The test for C99 compiler is not perfect (and
399     it is not as easy to make it perfect as it sounds), so sometimes this
400     may be needed. You will get a compile error if your compiler doesn't
401     support enough C99.
402
403
404 4.2. "No POSIX conforming shell (sh) was found."
405
406     xzgrep and other scripts need a shell that (roughly) conforms
407     to POSIX. The configure script tries to find such a shell. If
408     it fails, you can force the shell to be used by passing
409     gl_cv_posix_shell=/path/to/posix-sh as an argument to the configure
410     script.
411
412
413 4.3. configure works but build fails at crc32_x86.S
414
415     The easy fix is to pass --disable-assembler to the configure script.
416
417     The configure script determines if assembler code can be used by
418     looking at the configure triplet; there is currently no check if
419     the assembler code can actually actually be built. The x86 assembler
420     code should work on x86 GNU/Linux, *BSDs, Solaris, Darwin, MinGW,
421     Cygwin, and DJGPP. On other x86 systems, there may be problems and
422     the assembler code may need to be disabled with the configure option.
423
424     If you get this error when building for x86-64, you have specified or
425     the configure script has misguessed your architecture. Pass the
426     correct configure triplet using the --build=CPU-COMPANY-SYSTEM option
427     (see INSTALL.generic).
428
429
430 4.4. Lots of warnings about symbol visibility
431
432     On some systems where symbol visibility isn't supported, GCC may
433     still accept the visibility options and attributes, which will make
434     configure think that visibility is supported. This will result in
435     many compiler warnings. You can avoid the warnings by forcing the
436     visibility support off by passing gl_cv_cc_visibility=no as an
437     argument to the configure script. This has no effect on the
438     resulting binaries, but fewer warnings looks nicer and may allow
439     using --enable-werror.
440